memoir

Blue, white and yellow geometric shapes resembling a flower with the title in the middle

The Reason I Jump

Naoki Higashida
5
Rated by
Bethany T.
Monday, Apr 28, 2014

Naoki Higashida is a thirteen-year-old boy with autism so severe that he cannot speak aloud. But using an alphabet grid, he--letter by letter--has composed this missive from the depths of autism, revealing that a clever mind and keen perception lie behind the limits of his disorder.

Wednesday, Apr 23, 2014

In his new book, Scott Stossel describes his harrowing experience with clinical anxiety as well as its origins as a psychiatric disease. He looks at the philosophical and biological underpinnings of anxiety and the amazing response from pharmacology, both as a benefit for those who suffer from the illness and as an industry that pathologizes normal emotions upon the arrival of drugs that can alter them.

Title letters in red spelled out on cover

Sister Mother Husband Dog, (etc.)

Delia Ephron
5
Rated by
Sarah A.
Thursday, Mar 20, 2014

Delia Ephron has written an entertaining group of personal essays that range from the deeply touching to the absurdly humorous in Sister Mother Husband Dog, (etc.) The first essay in the book is a tribute to her late sister, the writer Nora Ephron. The two sisters worked together writing screenplays for several popular movies, including You’ve Got Mail and Sleepless in Seattle. Certainly she writes of her sister in a loving way, but she also shares with us the humanness of the relationship – the jealousy and the competition.

Wild Comfort

Kathleen Dean Moore
5
Rated by
Hannah Jane C.
Monday, Dec 23, 2013

Perhaps the best essay in Wild Comfort is the piece that launches the collection, The Solace of Snakes. It’s possible that it’s my favorite essay because of her cunning implementation of snake tins (sheets of metal) to give snakes a proper home in a cleared field. Kathleen Dean Moore further explains her recordings each day as she carefully lifts the snake tins and examines the life beneath: “A large vole. . .

Relish by Lucy Knisley

Relish: My Life In The Kitchen

Lucy Knisley
4
Friday, Dec 20, 2013

The smell of baking cookies brings back memories of mother's kitchen...Biting into a fresh tomato recalls the garden behind your childhood home...Watching the yellow powder and milk combine to create delicious macaroni and cheese reminds you of your first apartment. For author Lucy Knisley, as for many of us, food is a trip down memory lane. With a caterer mother and foodie father, her life has been defined and marked by some of the best (and worst food).

Thursday, Oct 3, 2013

These days, I read a lot of mom-oirs – enough to feel justified making up a word to describe the sub-genre clash of parenting book meets memoir. My twins are fifteen months old. They toddle and they’re fickle, irrational, urgent, tiny, and I love them. Just like the subtitle says.

Cover showing brown owl against cream background

Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls

David Sedaris
4
Rated by
Hope H.
Wednesday, Oct 2, 2013

Don’t be fooled, you’ll learn nothing about diabetes or owls here, but the random suggestion makes it all the more entertaining. Shortly before this book was released, I had the privilege of attending “An Evening with David Sedaris” in Kansas City, where I got a preview of some of the hilarious treasures to come in Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls. Sedaris likes to test his pieces with various live audiences, tweaking them along the way until they are primed for publishing, and

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2013

Fourteen-year-old Jenny shares her daily life with her diary "Dee." Jenny's younger brother Ezra is a common topic. You see, Ezra has autism and Jenny feels connected to him by an invisible cord which helps her keep track of him and his moods. Jenny also feels responsible for keeping Ezra out of trouble and for protecting him from those who don't understand Ezra's actions and autism.

Love is a Mix Tape

Love is a Mix Tape

Rob Sheffield
5
Rated by
Rachel S.H.
Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013

I like to think of myself as a modern woman -- cool, level-headed, doesn’t cry easily, likes Duran Duran, but not too much.

Leave it to Rolling Stone editor Rob Sheffield and his ruminations on Pat Benatar, Whitney Houston, Sleater-Kinney and Pavement to make me cry like a baby. It also wreaked havoc on my bank account as I went on an iTunes downloading spree. Hanson's "MMMBop," anyone?

Wesley the Owl by Stacie O'Brien

0
Rated by
Hannah Jane C.
Thursday, Aug 15, 2013

Wesley the Owl is a fascinating story about the 19 years Stacie O’Brien shares with Wesley, a barn owl. Stacie, an employee at Caltech, is offered the opportunity to raise a barn owl. She immediately accepts the offer and throws herself into the arduous but overwhelmingly poignant task of creating a happy and long life for her new feathered baby. Wesley thrives in Stacie’s care, and Stacie, in return, becomes the best owl mother a

Pages