poetry

#IHeartU Writing Contest Winner

Karin L. Frank
5
Rated by
Helen H.
Wednesday, Dec 9, 2015

The Local Writers committee is pleased to announce Karin L. Frank has won our #IHeartU poetry contest with her entry Solace. We love the poem's progression from start to last lines, and the contrast between young and old. We enjoyed the sophisticated vocabulary punctuating strong imagery, and the poem is especially pleasing when read aloud. Try it! We're excited to hear Frank's reading of her own work at our April 9th 2nd Saturday event. Tell us what you like about Solace in the comments.

Arlin Buyert

Oh Say Can You See: War Poems

Arlin Buyert
5
Rated by
Hannah Jane C.
Monday, May 11, 2015

Arlin Buyert’s latest collection, Oh Say Can You See, opens with "Big Brother", a poem that exposes the aftermath of a spirit ravaged by war. It is a candid poem that ensnares the reader in raw emotion, a poem of spare words, grounding details and a haunting and unforgettable metaphor: “someone else came home:/quiet and brittle as a dead tree.” By the end of the poem, I felt as if Bobbie was my big brother.

Line drawing of a little character ready a book of stories and surrounded by small illustrations in the red background

The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume I

hitRECord and Joseph Gordon-Levitt
5
Rated by
Hope H.
Tuesday, Jul 1, 2014

The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume I is a creative, charming compilation of 1-5 sentence stories, poems, and artwork. The dainty book features 67 of the more than 8500 contributions originally submitted for the volume. Some made me laugh, others made me pause and reflect, and I kept flipping back to certain illustrations just to savor them a little longer. My favorite tiny story:

In the Palm of Your Hand

Steve Kowit
5
Rated by
Hannah Jane C.
Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014

In the Palm of Your Hand isn’t just a handy poetry guide for poets, it also contains a hefty chunk of poems from both known and lesser-known poets. Steve Kowit masterfully demonstrates that a combination of both writing and reading is essential for a strong and extensive writing path.

The book is organized quite well with simple but thorough explanations of various aspects and forms of poetry followed by thoughtful exercises. Poems are peppered throughout the book, offering direction, insight and inspiration.

Thursday, Nov 7, 2013

David Rothenberg's Bug Music is a highly readable and eccentric investigation into an aspect of nature too easily taken for granted. Bugs produce very mathematical sounds based on natural cycles. What human ears are able to delineate is really only the tip of a very large iceberg connected to other icebergs. Delving deeply into the sounds of cicadas, crickets and katydids, Rothenberg is not afraid to suddenly go big-picture on his readers. He aims for nothing less than a direct connection between a cricket’s chirp and jazz band’s rhythm section.

Saturday, Oct 19, 2013

Love this author – love this illustrator – love this author and illustrator combo – love this book. That’s a lot of love, but if you read this book I think you’ll agree with me. I don’t remember how I came across the illustrator Mark Hearld, but my guess (and hope) is that we will be seeing and hearing a lot more from this talented British artist. His mixed media work reminds me of Eric Carle, but colorful and vibrant in a fresh new way.

Something Permanent

Cynthia Rylant and Walker Evans
3
Rated by
Hannah Jane C.
Thursday, Sep 5, 2013

Walker Evans and Cynthia Rylant form a simply magical rapport in Something Permanent. Cynthia Rylant’s connection to the photographs is quite eerie given that the book came to fruition after the passing of Walker Evans. It’s as if she has studied the photographs for hours, interviewed Evans, painstakingly plucked the hidden words from the pictures, and shaped them into poems. The poems and photographs surrounded me, and as an outsider separated b

Thursday, Jun 24, 2010

In the spring of 1998, as part of my studies for my master’s degree in English, I signed up for a course called “Middle English Alliterative Verse.” When I saw the syllabus, it shocked me: We were to translate thousands of lines of medieval English into the modern.

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