Staff Picks

Staff Review Feb 18, 2010

Next month, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is featuring 19th century photography of Egypt. If you're planning to take young friends along, consider supplying them with some books that will pique their interest and prepare them for the experience.

Staff Review

Paddle-to-the-Sea

By
0
Rated by Terri B.
Feb 17, 2010

Paddle-to-the-Sea by Holling C. Holling, is an enjoyable, quick read about the travels of a carved miniature canoe and indian. It begins its journey from Nipigon country in Canada with basic descriptions of the beautiful countryside. The canoe makes its way throughout the Great Lakes until its journey ends across the Atlantic in France. Good elementary supplement if studying the geography of these bodies of water. Caldecott Honor book.

Staff Review Feb 17, 2010

I’ve always felt that the central beauty of Anne Tyler’s work is the way in which it ennobles the common man. Characters often fumble around in the existential darkness, but usually find their way. Liam Pennywell, the central character in Tyler’s Noah’s Compass, is the newest in a long line of characters who eventually find inspiration in unexpected places.

Staff Review Feb 17, 2010

In this first YA novel by author Michelle Rowen (known best for her light-hearted supernatural adult fiction), we meet Nikki Donovan, a just turned 16 year old who has recently started at another new school. Her mother, a writer, is continually moving them at the whim of her latest relationship. Nikki has never known/met her father.

Staff Review Feb 17, 2010

In Truesight, by David Stahler, blindness is considered to be the path to “true sight”, a pure way of life. What started as a small community of blind people grew to a large community of people genetically manipulated to be born blind.

Staff Review Feb 17, 2010

“Since John Logie Baird invented the color television in 1944, I refuse to watch anything on TV in black and white.” Does this sound like something you would say? Please make an exception and watch this classic film starring Ronald Coleman and Jane Wyatt. A recent conversation with colleagues brought up the subject of Lost Horizon and Shangri-la and I remembered how much I had enjoyed re-runs of this movie on late night TV over 40 years ago. I don’t know how many times I watched it but I absolutely loved it.

Staff Review Feb 12, 2010

Anne Tyler considers Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant her best novel, and I can see why. Channeling his protagonist Holden Caulfield, J.D.

Staff Review Feb 12, 2010

I really enjoy reading books found in the cookbook section of the library's collection. The author Sandra Lee says, "Real meals for real life".  She offers organizing tips in the beginning of her book and colorful pictures throughout her book of each delicious dish! This month has been chilly and I am looking forward to trying the Roasted Tomato-Basil Soup on page 150! Also the Tropical Fruit Salad with Key Lime Yogut sounds good too on page 173.

Staff Review Feb 11, 2010

I was leery of this science fiction film; I didn’t like the sound of the plot. The year is 2057, and the sun is dying. Well, first of all, according to all the science I’ve read, Earth’s sun isn’t in danger of dying, going supernova or expanding into a red giant and engulfing the planet anytime soon (put the latter on your calendar for, oh, about five billion years from now).

Staff Review Feb 11, 2010

Canadian singer/guitarist Bruce Cockburn (pronounced CO-burn) has had the kind of career that is enviable from a critical standpoint and somewhat regrettable from a popular one. That is, Cockburn’s memorable, intelligent songs have been praised over and over in the music magazines, but after decades of doing this, he’s still not that well-known to the public.

Pages